In today’s digital world, ensuring the authenticity and security of our communications is more important than ever. PGP (Pretty Good Privacy) and GnuPG (GNU Privacy Guard) are tools designed to provide secure encryption and decryption of data, playing a crucial role in protecting privacy and information. A key component of this security model is the “web of trust,” an informal network of users who verify and sign each other’s public keys.

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It’s been a while (well, years) since I rotated my GPG keys, and to be honest, now that I know better how to handle a GPG key pair in order to avoid master key rotation, I think it’s the time to get a new pair. This tutorial will show you the steps I followed with explanations on what we are achieving in every step. Environment This is the GnuPG version used in this tutorial (if you are using a different version, probably not every command would work the same, but I wouldn’t expect for the concept to change that much):

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Every single working day I spend between 2 and 2.5 hours in a train. And I feel pretty lucky about this, mostly because is one single train, no need to pay attention for switch overs or other kind of public transports, and that allows me to invest that time in whatever task I want: podcasts, videos, blogging or even programming. And that’s what I want this post to focus in, because there are plenty of posts that explain how to use a Chromebook for day-to-day tasks (even being offline) but not that many that talk about programming in node.

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Code modularization, achieved in one way or another, is a technique a good developer must aim for because it helps keeping things small, well-tested and organized. And of course, it follows the DRY directive. So as a Node.js developer (and maybe contributor to the Open Source), creating and publishing an NPM module is one of those steps you will eventually face. Probably if any Node.js developer would have to pick an indispensable tool of the ecosystem, npm would win by far.

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Are you already in love with Git? I’m pretty sure of that, that’s the reason why you are reading this, huh? These are the steps you should follow to migrate an existing SVN repository to a Git one: 1 – Create a file where you will map SVN users to Git users, following this pattern: svn_user = git_user This is the one I created to migrate some SVN repositories from Google Code:

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In a previous post, we have seen what Git is and its main characteristics. Now, we’ll go more into detail about its functionality and we’ll see what a usual day working with Git looks like. But before, some initial concepts: Repository: A working tree of files and directories which can be versioned, keeping track of every single modification made over the working tree, been able to move forward and backward in its history.

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One of the key tools of a software project development is the repository where it’s hosted. During my experience as software developer I have been working with several flavors, such as Visual SourceSafe, CVS, Mercurial, and of course, SVN. But latetly I have found this little jewel called Git. Git was initially developed by Linus Torvalds as a result of an unsuccessful research to replace the propietary SCM BitKeeper, used back in 2005 in the Linux Kernel project (kinda strange that the opensource star project was hosted with a propietary software, huh?

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Creo que es la primera vez que posteo sobre una aplicación, pero creo que en este caso merece la pena hacerlo. Se trata de GNU HttpTunnel, una pequeña aplicación que crea un túnel HTTP sobre el que podemos meter cualquier servicio. ¿Ventajas? Pues que al ser HTTP, si nos encontramos en una red que solo tiene salida a Internet mediante un proxy HTTP, con esta aplicación (y un PC fuera de la red), podemos salir de la red con el servicio que más nos interese.

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Tras varios años de rumorología acerca de si Google iba a publicar un navegador web propio o no, finalmente se ha aclarado: su nombre es Chrome. Será un proyecto opensource basado en WebKit de Apple (el motor de renderizado de Safari) y según comentan, incluye un motor Javascript escrito desde cero, con el fin de mejorar el desempeño tanto en tiempo de ejecución como en consumo de memoria, con respecto a los navegadores que actualmente hay en el mercado.

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Ésto me lo acabo de encontrar navegando por internet. La verdad es que es muy impresionante: Se trata de un sistema semejante a un escritorio físico, de los de verdad. Tendremos una especie de mesa con los documentos, los archivos sobre ella. Con el ratón podremos moverlos de un lado a otro de nuestra mesa virtual, y gracias a diversos gestos, podremos agruparlos, apilarlos, ordenarlos, moverlos, y multitud de opciones de la Vida Real, pero con nuestro ordenador y de un modo virtual.

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Author's picture

Daniel Pecos Martínez

Developer. Blogger. HAM Radio operator.

I write about technology, software, radio and some other interests, like Linux, Dungeons and Dragons or electronics.

Lead Software Developer at Abcam.

Fullstack Developer

Amsterdam